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Nettleton Insights - December 12, 2012

December 12, 2012

Nettleton Insights Is Back! We've been on hiatus for a number of months, but now the Nett Report is back in a new simpler-to-read format, both for smart phones and browsers. We've also created a new Nettleton Strategies web page where you can: where you can:

  • Learn about our work, services and expertise.
  • Check out the Natural Hazards Map with real time access to hurricanes, volcanoes, wildfires and earthquakes around the globe. The map is an example of how Nettleton Strategies can provide intelligent mapping services.

Please remember that for facilitation, analysis, insight, communications and connections, Nettleton Strategies is ready to help you!

Climate Change

What does climate change have to do with baseball? In baseball, batters using steroids hit more and longer home runs. No individual home run can be attributed to steroids since the baseball players were capable of hitting homers without the assistance of steroids. In the same way, no given storm can be attributed to climate change. But statistically, the intensity and number of storms will likely be more because of climate change, just like baseball players on steroids hit more home runs and hit them farther. This Business Week story places more light on the subject of "theweather-on-steroids." Scripps Institution of Oceanography researcher Dr. Richard Somerville also shared the story on KPBS.In baseball, batters using steroids hit more and longer home runs. No individual home run can be attributed to steroids since the baseball players were capable of hitting homers without the assistance of steroids. In the same way, no given storm can be attributed to climate change. But statistically, the intensity and number of storms will likely be more because of climate change, just like baseball players on steroids hit more home runs and hit them farther. This Business Week story places more light on the subject of "theweather-on-steroids." Scripps Institution of Oceanography researcher Dr. Richard Somerville also shared the story on KPBS.

Interactive Sea Level Map. The New York Times recently published an interactive map that shows how sea level rise could affect various cities if the rise was anywhere from 0 feet to 25 feet. The State of California’s official projections assume a 55 inch rise by 2100, nearly five feet.

Oceans

OpenOceans Global. We spent most of the summer and fall focused on developing funding for OpenOceans Global, the non-profit, non-advocacy organization dedicated to creating an international, cross-sector ocean community focused on aggregating and creativly displaying the world's ocean data. Please check out the web site and blog and consider an end-of-the year contribution to the development of this international institution!

Human Genome Project for the Ocean. An OpenOceans Global article, "From Fear to Hope, A Human Genome Project for the Ocean," recently appeared in Hydro International, a global ocean industry publication reaching 20,000 readers in addition to its online reach. The article focused on the importance of the use of maps to tell the stories of ocean research.

Hawaii Ocean Research and Economic Development. We recently visited the Natural Energy Laboratory on the Big Island of Hawaii. The 322-acre facility brings 41 degree (Fahrenheit) water from 3,000 feet below the surface of the ocean and warm surface water ranging between 76 to 81 degrees to the facility. The original intent was to create energy from the temperature differential, but now the facility has expanded to 40 tenants, ranging from alternative energy, to aquaculture, to research and more. The state facility next to Kona International Airport generates more than $45 million in annual economic impact, creating more than 300 jobs and high value exports.

The Perpetual Ocean. If you are interested in the ocean and haven’t seen the Perpetual Ocean video by NASA, it is sure to intrigue you. The video combines several years of data to visualize current patterns on the world’s oceans.

Floating Windmills Off California Coast? The Department of Energy (DOE) is scheduled to make a decision on whether to allow a pilot program using floating wind turbines off the coast of California. DOE in March unveiled a six-year, $180 million research initiative to support deployment of offshore wind technologies that have potential for lowering the cost of energy below 10 cents per kilowatt hour. This is the threshold at which DOE believes the sector can compete with other regional generation sources without subsidies.

Energy

Solar Boat Sails Into the Record Books. A Swiss adventurer has circumnavigated the globe in 585 days on a 98-foot yacht powered solely by the sun. Raphael Domjan’s boat, "Turanor," has enough photo-voltaic panels to cover two tennis courts.The journey was designed “to show the world that this technology is not science fiction, it is very real and it can help us change how we do things now rather than in the future," Domjan said.

E2 Reports. Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2), a national community of business leaders who promote sound environmental policy that builds economic prosperity, has released several reports in recent weeks addressing biofuels and energy jobs. These include: "The Econonomic Benefits of Military Biofuels," "Third Quarter Clean Energy Jobs Roundup," and "An Advanced Biofuel Market Fact Sheet and Report."

Energy Resources Web Sites. Two web sites we recently learned about provide valuable information regarding the status of various energy resources around the world. Developed in part by National Geographic, Energy Realities is a site that provides visualizations about the world’s energy resources. Domestic Fuels has created a mapping report: “State by State Resource for Renewable Energy.”

Water

Rains and Lake Oroville. Recent rains in Northern California have begun to have an effect on water supplies. Because of its prominence in the State Water Project system, Lake Oroville is a good indicator of the status of water supplies for the coming year. Recent northern California rainfall has spiked the reservoir water levels upward from a drought projection back to more average water levels. The Department of Water Resources projects 30 percent of requested deliveries will be provided by the State Water Project next year, an estimate that could increase depending on precipitation.

Water Privatization Pro and Con. The Wall Street Journal recently published a thoughtful pro and con article about privatizing water utilities. Neither of the two policy experts saw privatization as a panacea, but each discussed the benefits and downsides.

The Economy

1972 Report Might be Right. A Smithsonian analysis of a 1972 report called “The Limits of Growth,” says there is validity to the report’s projection that the world economy could collapse by 2030. At the time, economists disagreed with the report. The new analysis by Australian physicist Graham Turner says that “we are not on a sustainable track” but that could change “if governments forged policies and invested in technologies to regulate the expansion of humanity’s ecological footprint.”

 

Share: https://www.nettstrategies.com/Blog/Blog7/Nettleton-Insights--December-12-2012

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